Arrak
  Arvid
  Benfield
  Bourrie
  Boward
  Chen
  Cook
  DeChino
  Delacroix
  Delacroix_
  dePaola
  Dodsworth
  Dojer
  Emanuel
  Estivalet
  Fairchild
  Fazzino
  Gregory
  Hall
  HeNeng
  Hurtado
  Ivanov
  Jeremenko
  Jiang
  Kissmer
  Lange
  Liepke
  Mack
  Markus
  McCullough
  Peters
  Pierson
  Richardson
  Robichaud
  Sandell
  Schulman
  Seuss
  Shojaei
  Singley
  Spence
  Stotts
  Suljakov
  Surret
  Thorpe
  Treby
  Trey
  Tsaava
  Wallace
  White
  Wick
  Yuroz
  Zarin
  Zule

  home
  contact us
  about us
  see a list
  of other artists

space.gif (51 bytes)
  Alexander
Ivanov

Alexander Ivanov was born in Leningrad, now St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1950. As a child he spent much of his spare time in the Hermitage Museum nurturing his interest in classical and ancient Russian art. At age sixteen, Ivanov began studies at the Leningrad Art & Graphic School. During this time, his newfound love of 60s jazz and the influences of Chagall inspired his work and created conflicts with his teachers and Soviet officials. During that period in Russia, Formalism and Individualism would not be tolerated; Social Realism was the only accepted form of art. Unable to live with the repression of his art, Ivanov left the art school in 1972, his 4th year, and decided to search for freedom by joining a geological expedition to the north of Russia. As he had always had a romance with the north, he settled near the city of Archangel. There he explored the traditions and folk art of the region, adopting forms of Russian ikons into his work and a traditional woodworking technique, Lubek. Although he exhibited in small showings throughout the early 1970s, Ivanov's first one man show in 1977 opened and closed the same day, the victim of official oppression. It was about this time in Leningrad that artists were beginning to organize clandestine exhibitions in private apartments. This drew Ivanov back to Leningrad, where he joined a group of artists and exhibited his work in that city and Moscow. Despite his activity as a painter and prinmaker, Ivanov was obliged to work in a boiler room to support his family. Even so, he was able to spend much of his time making musical instruments. Instruments and players figure consistently in his artwork today. In the later 1980s several Moscow firms published illustrations and calendars of Ivanov's images. At the same time, his work was discovered by the German government, who invited him to take part in a Russia/German symposium. From there he was invited to exhibit in Holland and England. His work was then discovered by galleries in America and Japan and is now widely exhibited throughout the world.


girl_pic_top.gif (7463 bytes)
girl_pic_bottom.gif (11607 bytes)
ew_title.gif (3601 bytes)
space.gif (51 bytes)